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Cervical Esophageal Cancer

Determining Your Prognosis

Your prognosis is a prediction of the outcome of your disease. What is the risk of succumbing to the cancer or the risk of its coming back? These are the big questions on most people’s minds after receiving a diagnosis of throat cancer. Prognosis is based on many factors, and a survival rate is an estimate based on large populations of patients who have been given a similar stage of their throat cancer. There are many specific factors that are unique to each patient that may influence treatment success.

The following aspects of the cancer may affect your prognosis.

Stage of Cancer This is the most important factor that affects your chances of being cured.
Grade of Cancer This is particularly important for adenocarcinoma.
Depth of Invasion Some studies have shown that how deep the tumor goes into the esophagus wall can be associated with survival.
Type of Cancer Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus has a slightly worse prognosis than adenocarcinoma (12 percent survival at five years versus 15 percent at 5 years).

It is very difficult to discuss prognosis without understanding all the details of your cancer, and this is a conversation you’re better off having in person with your doctor.

To give you a percentage chance of cure is difficult because the SEER data groups different types of cancers together and may include patients from a long time ago. SEER stands for Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results. It is a cancer database maintained by the National Cancer Institute. This database collects statistics on patients with cancer around the country. In general, according to SEER data, the five-year survival of cervical esophageal cancer is reported to be 15 percent.

References

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