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Skin Cancer

Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer


Skin cancer can present in a few different ways:

  • A lesion on the skin of the face, neck or scalp: Some cancers are very slow growing and slow changing; others change quickly. If you see a new lesion on your body, you should have it evaluated by a dermatologist (skin doctor). Most lesions are not cancer, and most cancers of the skin are slow growing and easily treated. But because some lesions don’t fit into one of those categories, you should have them checked out. If something is growing quickly, don’t wait to have it evaluated.

The well-known mnemonic “ABCDE” should be kept in mind for any type of skin lesion.

64_ABCDEThese are signs that should heighten the concern for melanoma.

  • An itchy and bleeding area: Sometimes you might not be able to see a lesion on the scalp. But if you notice something constantly bleeding or really itchy or painful, it’s worth having it checked out by a doctor.
  • Nothing at all: Some people at an increased risk of getting skin cancer might not notice a lesion at all. These patients may choose to visit a dermatologist regularly for a skin evaluation. This is called screening. Patients who are immunocompromised should undergo routine skin screenings due to the increased risk of skin cancers in general and specifically more aggressive skin cancers.
  • A lump or bump in the neck or face: In some cases, the first sign of a skin cancer might actually be a bump or lump in the neck or the face. This could represent a lymph node. Lymph nodes in the part of the neck behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle (the big muscle in the neck) and lymph nodes in the parotid gland (the salivary gland over your jawbone onto your cheek) that turn out to be cancerous should raise the concern for a skin cancer that spread there.

 

References

1 Miller DL, Weinstock MA. Nonmelanoma skin cancer in the United State: Incidence. J Am Academy of Dermatology. 1994;30:774.

2 American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2012. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2012.

3 Albores-Saavedra J, Batich K, Chable-Montero F, Sagy N, Schwartz AM, Henson DE. Merkel cell carcinoma demographics, morphology, and survival based on 3870 cases: a population based study. J Cutan Pathol. 2010:37:20-27.

4 LeBoit PE, Burg G, Weedon D, Sarasain A. (Eds.): World Health Organization. Classification of Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Skin Tumours. IARC Press: Lyon 2006.

5 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Basal Cell and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers V.1.2014. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2014. All rights reserved. Accessed Jan. 22, 2014. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

6 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Melanoma V.3.2014. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2014. All rights reserved. Accessed Feb 12, 2014. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

7 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Merkel Cell Carcinoma V.1.2014. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2014. All rights reserved. Accessed Jan. 22, 2014. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

8 Referenced with permission from the NCCN Guidelines for Patients®: Melanoma V.1.2013. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2013. All rights reserved. Accessed July 2, 2013. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

9 Rubin AI, Chen EH, Ratner D. Basal Cell Carcinoma. N Engl J Med. 2005;353:2262-2269.

10 Walling HW, Fosko SW, Geraminejad PA, Whitaker DC, Arpey CJ. Aggressive basal cell carcinoma: Presentation, pathogenesis, and management. Cancer and Metastasis Reviews. 2004;23(3-4):389-402.

11 Hollestein LM, de Vries E, Nijsten T. Trends of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in the Netherlands: Increased incidence rates, but stable relative survival and mortality 1989-2008. European Journal of Cancer. 2012;48(13):2046-2053.

12 Lardar T, Shea SM, Sharfman W, Liegeois N, Sober AJ. Improvements in the Staging of Cutaneous Squamous-Cell Carcinoma in the 7th Edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2010;17(8):1979-1980.

13 Cockburn M, Peng D, Key C. Chapter 12: Melanoma. Ries LAG, Young JL, Keel GE, Eisner MP, Lin YD, Horner M-J (editors). SEER Survival Monograph: Cancer Survival Among Adults: U.S. SEER Program, 1988-2001, Patient and Tumor Characteristics. National Cancer Institute, SEER Program, NIH Pub. No. 07-6215, Bethesda, MD, 2007.

14 Edge SB, et al. The AJCC Cancer Staging Manual – Seventh Edition. American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010. Chapter 31: Melanoma of the Skin. P329.

15 Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, Neyman N, Aminou R, Altekruse SF, Kosary CL, Ruhl J, Tatalovich Z, Cho H, Mariotto A, Eisner MP, Lewis DR, Chen HS, Feuer EJ, Cronin KA (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2009 (Vintage 2009 Populations), National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD.

16 Agelli M, Clegg LX. Epidemiology of primary Merkel cell carcinoma in the United States. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2003;49:832-41.

17 Engels EA, Frisch M, Goedert JJ, Biggar RJ, Miller RW. Merkel cell carcinoma and HIV infection. The Lancet. 2002;359(9305):497-498.

18 Buell JF, Trofe J, Hanaway MJ, et al. Immunosuppresion and Merkel cell cancer. Transplant Proc. 2002;34(5):1780-1.

19 Penn I, First MR. Merkel cell carcinoma in organ recipients: report of 41 cases. Transplantation. 1999;68(11):1717-21.

20 Young JL, Ward, KC, Ries LAG. Chapter 30: Cancers of Rare Sites. Ries LAG, Young JL, Keel GE, Eisner MP, Lin YD, Horner M-J (editors). SEER Survival Monograph: Cancer Survival Among Adults: U.S. SEER Program, 1988-2001, Patient and Tumor Characteristics. National Cancer Institute, SEER Program, NIH Pub. No. 07-6215, Bethesda, MD, 2007.

21 Albores-Saavedra J, Batich K, Chable-Montero F, Sagy N, Schwartz AM, Henson DE. Merkel cell carcinoma demographics, morphology, and survival based on 3870 cases: a population based study. J Cutan Pathol. 2010:37:20.

22 Wang TS, Byrne PJ, Jacobs LK, Taube JM. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Update and Review. 2011 Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery: 30(1):48-56.

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