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Relocating for Cancer Care

If you live in a rural area or in an area where clinicians may not have significant experience with head and neck cancer, you may want to consider relocating for some or all of your medical care. Alternatively, you may want to find an NCI-designated hospital that includes medical specialists with an expertise in head and neck cancer. This may necessitate relocating to obtain your cancer care.

Relocating to obtain cancer care is likely to require time off from your place of employment. If so, you may want to check with your work place to determine if you qualify for The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).12 Hoffman B. Cancer survivors at work: a generation of progress. CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Sep-Oct;55(5):271-80. If you do qualify, then you will be entitled to have 12 weeks of unpaid leave to receive treatment.12 Hoffman B. Cancer survivors at work: a generation of progress. CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Sep-Oct;55(5):271-80. Your health insurance, provided that you had this benefit, will remain active during your medical leave of absence.12 Hoffman B. Cancer survivors at work: a generation of progress. CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Sep-Oct;55(5):271-80.

http://vimeo.com/64108654
If you have an unusual type of cancer, it’s important to go to a place where they see it all the time.Linda K. (maxillary sinus carcinoma survivor)

References

1 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Head and Neck Cancers V.2.2014. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2014. All rights reserved. Accessed June 18, 2014. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

2 Gaziano JE. Evaluation and management of oropharyngeal Dysphagia in head and neck cancer. Cancer Control. 2002 Sep-Oct;9(5):400-9.

3 Chen H-C, Evans KFK, Salgado CJ, Mardini S. Methods of voice reconstruction. Seminars in Plastic Surgery. 2010:227-232.

4 National Cancer Institute Website. Accessed at http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary on February 18, 2013.

5 Marur S, Forastiere AA. Head and neck cancer: changing epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Mayo Clin Proc. 2008 Apr;83(4):489-501.

6 Ko CY, Chang JT, Chaudhry S, Kominski G. Are high-volume surgeons and hospitals the most important predictors of in-hospital outcome for colon cancer resection? Surgery. 2002 Aug;132(2):268-73.

7 Karanicolas PJ, Dubois L, Colquhoun PH, Swallow CJ, Walter SD, Guyatt GH. The more the better?: the impact of surgeon and hospital volume on in-hospital mortality following colorectal resection. Ann Surg. 2009 Jun;249(6):954-9.

8 Billingsley KG, Morris AM, Dominitz JA, et al. Surgeon and hospital characteristics as predictors of major adverse outcomes following colon cancer surgery: understanding the volume-outcome relationship. Arch Surg. 2007 Jan;142(1):23-31; discussion 32.

9 Hillner BE, Smith TJ, Desch CE. Hospital and physician volume or specialization and outcomes in cancer treatment: importance in quality of cancer care. J Clin Oncol. 2000 Jun;18(11):2327-40.

10 Friese CR, Earle CC, Silber JH, Aiken LH. Hospital characteristics, clinical severity, and outcomes for surgical oncology patients. Surgery. 2010 May;147(5):602-9.

11 National Cancer Institute Website. Accessed at http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary on February 18, 2013.

12 Hoffman B. Cancer survivors at work: a generation of progress. CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Sep-Oct;55(5):271-80.