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Hypopharyngeal Cancer

Causes of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

As with most cancers, doctors can’t tell you with certainty what causes hypopharyngeal cancer. It’s a combination of genetic factors and factors in your environment.

By far the most common factor contributing to hypopharyngeal cancer is using tobacco, particularly smoking it. Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol also contributes to the risk of developing cancer of the hypopharynx.

  • Tobacco: Smoking cigarettes, cigars or pipes and using chewing tobacco greatly increase your chance of getting a hypopharynx cancer.3 Menvielle G, Luce D, Goldberg P, Leclerc A. Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. International journal of epidemiology. Aug 2004;33(4):799-806.
  • Alcohol: Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol is also very strongly related to getting hypopharyngeal cancer. Moreover, if you both smoke and drink heavily, the risk more than doubles.3 Menvielle G, Luce D, Goldberg P, Leclerc A. Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. International journal of epidemiology. Aug 2004;33(4):799-806.

Other factors that can increase your chance of getting hypopharyngeal cancer include:

  • Exposure to radiation in the past: Being exposed to radiation as part of a natural disaster, treatment for another disease a long time ago or even through work can increase the chances of some hypopharynx cancers.
  • Plummer-Vinson Syndrome: This is a very rare disease seen in nonsmoking women between 30 and 50 years old. It is called a syndrome because it includes a pattern of symptoms, including difficulty with swallowing, a web of tissue that can partially block off the hypopharynx and low iron counts leading to low blood counts, along with weight loss.4 Larsson LG, Sandstrom A, Westling P. Relationship of Plummer-Vinson disease to cancer of the upper alimentary tract in Sweden. Cancer research. Nov 1975;35(11 Pt. 2):3308-3316.

Other factors that can increase the risk of developing cancer of the hypopharynx include:

  • A history of drinking poisons such as lye
  • Certain viruses
  • Asbestos exposure5Marchand JL, Luce D, Leclerc A, et al. Laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer and occupational exposure to asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers: results of a case-control study. Am J Ind Med. Jun 2000;37(6):581-589.
  • Genetic factors

 

References

1 Harrison DF. Pathology of hypopharyngeal cancer in relation to surgical management. The Journal of laryngology and otology. Apr 1970;84(4):349-367.

2 Shah JP, Shaha AR, Spiro RH, Strong EW. Carcinoma of the hypopharynx. Am J Surg. Oct 1976;132(4):439-443.

3 Menvielle G, Luce D, Goldberg P, Leclerc A. Smoking, alcohol drinking, occupational exposures and social inequalities in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. International journal of epidemiology. Aug 2004;33(4):799-806.

4 Larsson LG, Sandstrom A, Westling P. Relationship of Plummer-Vinson disease to cancer of the upper alimentary tract in Sweden. Cancer research. Nov 1975;35(11 Pt. 2):3308-3316.

5 Marchand JL, Luce D, Leclerc A, et al. Laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer and occupational exposure to asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers: results of a case-control study. Am J Ind Med. Jun 2000;37(6):581-589.

6 Dolan RW, Vaughan CW, Fuleihan N. Symptoms in early head and neck cancer: an inadequate indicator. Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery: official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Nov 1998;119(5):463-467.

7 Spiro RH, Thaler HT, Hicks WF, Kher UA, Huvos AH, Strong EW. The importance of clinical staging of minor salivary gland carcinoma. Am J Surg. 1991 Oct;162(4):330-6.

8 Krause CJ, Carey TE, Ott RW, Hurbis C, McClatchey KD, Regezi JA. Human squamous cell carcinoma. Establishment and characterization of new permanent cell lines. Arch Otolaryngol. Nov 1981;107(11):703-710.

9 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Head and Neck Cancers V.2.2016. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2016. All rights reserved. Accessed December 7, 2016. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org.

10 Piccirillo JF, Costas I, Reichman ME. Chapter 2: Cancers of the Head and Neck. Ries LAG, Young JL, Keel GE, Eisner MP, Lin YD, Horner M-J (editors). SEER Survival Monograph: Cancer Survival Among Adults: U.S. SEER Program, 1988-2001, Patient and Tumor Characteristics. National Cancer Institute, SEER Program, NIH Pub. No. 07-6215, Bethesda, MD, 2007.