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Neck Cancers

What to Expect After Treatment is Completed

Once you have made it through treatment, you need to have close follow-up with your doctor. Some guidelines are provided by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), depending on the primary site of the tumor.

Sarcoma follow-up: The current NCCN Guidelines recommend this follow-up plan after being treated for a soft tissue sarcoma.7Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Soft Tissue Sarcoma V.1.2013. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2013. All rights reserved. Accessed July 17, 2013. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.Some of it will depend on the stage and type of your sarcoma. In general, you should expect the following:

  • Have a rehabilitation team see you to help with function after treatment.
  • See a doctor and have some imaging of your chest (such as an X-Ray or CT scan) at regularly scheduled times.
  • Consider having baseline and periodic imaging of the primary site (CT scan, MRI or maybe even an ultrasound).

Lymphoma follow-up: Treatments and management of lymphoma can take a while and have multiple stages. Speak to your medical oncologist about the plan to watch for any signs of recurrence.

References

1 Gurney JG, Young JL, Roffers SD, Smith MA, Bunin GR. SEER pediatric monograph – soft tissue sarcomas. National Cancer Institute. Page 111. http://seer.cancer.gov/publications/childhood/softtissue.pdf.

2 Fletcher CDM, Rydholm A, Singer S, Sundaram M, Coindre JM. Soft Tissue Tumours. In: Barnes EL, Eveson JW, Reichart P, Sidransky D, editors. World Health Organization classification of tumours: pathology & genetics WHO Classification. Lyon: IARCPress; 2005.

3 Zhang MQ, El-Mofty SK, Dávila RM. Detection of human papillomavirus-related squamous cell carcinoma cytologically and by in situ hybridization in fine-needle aspiration biopsies of cervical metastasis: a tool for identifying the site of an occult head and neck primary. Cancer. 2008;114(2):118-23.

4 Cunningham MJ, Myers EN, Bluestone CD. Malignant tumors of the head and neck in children – a 20 year review. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 1987;(13)3:279-292.

5 Edge SB, et al. The AJCC Cancer Staging Manual – Seventh Edition. American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010. Page 611.

6 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Head and Neck Cancers V.2.2013. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2013. All rights reserved. Accessed June 20, 2013. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

7 Referenced with permission from The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Soft Tissue Sarcoma V.1.2013. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2013. All rights reserved. Accessed July 17, 2013. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.

8 Ries LAG, Young JL, Keel GE, Eisner MP, Lin YD, Horner M-J (editors). SEER Survival Monograph: Cancer Survival Among Adults: U.S. SEER Program, 1988-2001, Patient and Tumor Characteristics. National Cancer Institute, SEER Program, NIH Pub. No. 07-6215, Bethesda, MD, 2007.